New Lessons

I have spoken over 11,000 times in a span of 55-years in classes, sermons, lectures, radio, TV, banquets, debates, etc. In my early years of preaching meetings, it wasn’t unusual for dozens of attendees to respond for prayer, rededication, and baptism. It wasn’t unusual to have overt responses during Sunday morning and Sunday evening services as well as on Wednesday evenings.

     One brother recently tagged those past days as “The golden age when hearts weren’t encumbered with 101 attractions which prevented the word of God from ‘pricking people in their hearts and souls.’” Sadly some preachers can’t quickly recall when they last had a response to their preaching; especially for baptism. I visited a congregation that was using the baptistery as a storage place; assuring me they could have it ready in a couple of hours if they needed to baptize someone.

     What has created these phenomena in congregations of the Lord’s people? The Gospel hasn’t lost its power to convert (Romans 1:14-16). Preaching is still authorized by God’s word (Matthew 28:18-20). One answer lies in the sowing of the seed. In the simple but dynamic Parable of the Sower (Luke 8:11-15) Jesus spelled out clearly that the battle was occurring in the hearts of the hearers of the word. Even a casual reading of the text reveals that one out of four hearts will receive, keep, obey, and practice the word (Cf 8:15).

     Somewhere in our history congregations have created two distinct forms of communicating Scripture. First, is the pulpit where the preacher does all the talking thus creating a monologue? Second, the classrooms where questions and answers occur on a limited basis. Some attendees don’t bring their Bibles to either opportunity.

     The operative question is, why is this occurring in many congregations today? Coupled with the why is the question, what are the dynamics involved in producing this auditing effect at this time among the Lord’s people? In my opinion, there are several answers to these questions.

     From watching, listening, and reading sermons and lessons, past and present, presented in congregations across the nation there is evidence that both forms of communications, preaching and teaching, have fallen on tough times. There seems to be evidence that some of the issues relate to trying to match the entertainment activities of Hollywood, televangelists, and comedians. What is being passed of biblical messages in the pulpit and classroom is more like an attempt to entertain than “prick listener in their hearts” (Acts 2:37). A few Scriptures are tacked on with an overdose of human wisdom, pop-psychology, and feel-good emphasis. It’s the telling of “my story” more than the telling of HIS story. The response most frequently heard is, I enjoyed your sermon/lesson”, not “what must I do?”

     There are endless materials, products, and media gadgets to help us in our quest for spiritual growth. One media program which can be download on your phone or viewed on a computer makes it possible for you to listen to the Bible with background music so you can fall asleep. Have we become like the people in Isaiah’s day? “Who say to the seers, ‘Do not see,’ and to the prophets, ‘Do not prophesy to us right things; speak to us smooth things” (Isaiah 30:10).

THE ANSWER

     I believe the answer lies with both participants in the teaching and preaching event. The preacher/teacher and the hearers both have attitudes, disciplines, and responsibilities for creating the success of the event. No, this is not a blame game exercise but a reality check relative to making the learning event more dynamic.

     First, we must realize that our attention span is one of the major factors involved in communicating a message. There is shocking research that reveals that the average media attention span of Americans has now reached eight seconds, which is the challenge media marketers are facing today. When a person goes to a website he will spend a maximum of 11 seconds if it doesn’t grab him. A headline that doesn’t grab and a lengthy text that takes more than 8 to 10 seconds to read is a sure way to lead the inquirer to the exit. We are being programmed every waken second of the day by media involvement. Our cell phone brings a text or voice mail. Our Apple phone vibrates. Must check emails, Facebook, We watch ninety-five percent of video messages and only ten percent of reading texts. Media addiction is on the rise in our nations including the church. It’s becoming more difficult to “Be still and know that I am the Lord.”

     Second, we must realize the role the preacher and his sermon play in communicating to a congregation of people who are faced with the attention challenge. Years ago there was a book written for preacher entitled “30 Minute to Raise the Dead.” The emphasis was on a 30-minutes sermon. Today, the title might be “15-20 Minutes to Raise the Dead.” Yes, we can say if the brethren loved Jesus they would pay attention, learn, and practice what was being preached. I doubt that observation.

     In his book Empty Pulpit, published back in 1967, Clyde Reid wrote: “How do we explain the empty pulpit in our time? I am not here speaking of the empty pulpit of the many churches which cannot find ministers. I speak here of the deeper and more puzzling dilemma that even when a minister occupies the pulpit is often strangely empty—barren, sterile—to the man who sits in the pew. The pulpit today is empty in the sense that there is often no message heard, no results seen, and not power felt” (p.9, Harper & Row, Publishers, N.Y.)

     As noted the attention span of listeners plays a big part in the breakdown in communicating pulpit messages. However, the failure of the preacher to hone and adjust his preaching methodology plays a major role in communicating God’s word. Some preachers have gone to an overkill use of power points; some have sidetracked from “His story” to my personal story. Some have set the time target to meet the content of their sermons rather than the attention span of hearers. Few preachers practice their sermons before springing them on the hearers.

     In delivery, some preachers don’t have a clear introduction, which is usually too long. There isn’t a clear transitional promise sentence, and the points aren’t clear, or too many. Then there are the preachers who are committed to their favorite subjects which mean variety and larger coverage of Bible subjects are neglected. The conclusions are not “the end” but the addition of additional “shorter” messages. And there is the rare preacher who dares to critique his sermon a few days after he has delivered it.

     The preacher who pleases God is under the command given by Paul to Timothy: “Preach the word! Be ready in season and out of season. Convince, rebuke, exhort, with all longsuffering and teaching” (2 Timothy 4:2). Those who hear are under the commands given by Jesus: “Take heed HOW you hear” (Luke 8:18)…and “take heed WHAT you hear” (Mark 4:24).

     The preaching event is a partnership created by the preacher and those who hear. When both sides are prepared for the 20 to 30-minute event real communication will occur. Both participants need to come together and study ways and means to make the event a more meaningful “meeting of minds” in the word of God. This will contribute to change!

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

OBSERVATION: From watching, listening, and reading sermons and lessons, past and present, presented in churches across the nation, there is evidence that both forms of communication, preaching and teaching, have fallen on hard times, reaching levels that are trying to match the entertainment level of Hollywood, televangelists, and comedians. What is being passed off as biblical messages in the pulpit and classroom is more like an attempt to entertain than “prick listeners in their hearts” (Acts 2:37). A few Scriptures are tacked on with an overdose of human wisdom, comments, and feel-good emphasis. The response most frequently heard is “I enjoyed your sermon/message”, not “What shall I do?”

     Somewhere in our history congregations have created two distinct forms of communicating Scripture. First, the pulpit where the preacher does all the talking—a monologue. Second, the classroom where questions and answers occur on a limited basis. What both forms have created is a comfortable auditing system of “communication.”

     There are several media programs and phone applications where you can listen to Scriptures being read with soft background music and “fall asleep.” We have become duplicators of God’s people in the day of Isaiah: “Who say to the seers, ‘Do not see,’ and to the prophets, ‘Do not prophesy to us right things; speak unto us SMOOTH things’” (Isaiah 30:10). Solomon was right there “is nothing new under the sun”; just new ways of doing the same old things.

 

  1. A.In light of these observations, which are mild compared to the real in-depth problems we are facing, we need to revisit our Lord’s approach to preaching and teaching. He “left us an example that we should follow in His footsteps.”
    1. 1.While there are different words in the Greek language that reference “teaching” and “preaching” (E.g. “to teach—“didasko”, preach—“kerugma,” “to cry, to proclaim.”) In our English translations, we don’t notice the emphasis given by these words. We know God’s message is being both preached and taught.
    2. 2.Because in my opinion there has been a lack of emphasis on Jesus as The

Preacher, I will shine the spotlight on knowing Jesus as The Preacher based on what is revealed in Scripture, not the books of men.

 

SCRIPTURES ABOUT JESUS PREACHING

  1. A.Here are some Scriptures which present Jesus preaching:
    1. 1.Mark 1:38: “But He said unto them, ‘Let us go into the next TOWNS, that I may PREACH there also because for this PURPOSE I have come forth.’
    2. 2.Matthew 4:17: “From that time Jesus began to PREACH and to say, ‘Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.’”
    3. 3.Luke 4:18: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me, because he has anointed Me to PREACH the gospel to the poor…”
    4. 4.Luke 4:43: “But He said to them, ‘I MUST PREACH the kingdom of God, to the other cities also, because for this purpose I have been SENT.’”
    5. 5.Luke 4:45: And He was PREACHING in the synagogues of Galilee.”
    6. 6.Therefore, Jesus had beautiful feet:
    7. 7.The Father said, Hear His Son:

 

JESUS’ PREACHING AND COMMUNICATION STYLE

  1. B.Studying Jesus’ preaching style from a study of homiletics, speaking,         rhetoric, and communication style, I make these observations:

 

  1. 1.Jesus spoke in a simple and easy to be understood vocabulary. Some

Education scholars say taught of 3rd to 5th-grade level. “The common people heard him gladly” (Mk. 12:37)

  1. 2.Most of Jesus’ lessons were brief and to the point: “Sermon on Mount.” Matt. 5-7, 111-verses, Approximately 2,247 words, the average person reads 250 words per minute, take 12-15 minutes to read.
  2. 3.Jesus’ sermons were full of illustrations—Parables and metaphors: 36 parables, 100 metaphors. 75% of the Bible relates to events, stories, and people, etc. We remember 10-20% of what we hear and 30-40% of what we hear and see (Mental pictures), 70-90% of what we do (Cf. Jas. 1:20-27).
  3. 4.Jesus used Scripture (OT) in His messages. He said many times, “It is written” (Cf. Matt. 4:4, 7, 10). Quoted OT 78 times, Psalms most quoted, 17 times. Challenging others, “Search the Scriptures…” (Jno. 5:39-47. There are 300 OT quotes in NT.
  4. 5.Jesus’ sermons were confrontive (Scribes and Pharisees, Matt. 23).
  5. 6.Jesus’ sermons touched emotions: Luke 24:32, “And they said, one to another,’ Didn’t our heart burn within us while He talked with us on the road, and while he opened the Scripture to us’”.
  6. 7.Jesus’ preaching was never based on or exemplified “Respect of persons” (Ill. Woman at well, apostles, tax collector, eats with sinners, Lk. 15:1, 2, etc.).
  7. 8.Jesus’ preaching was specific, with no guessing (Lk. 13:3, 4) “Repent or perish…” “Confess me or be denied…” (Matt. 10:32).
  8. 9.Jesus’ preaching changed people: Matt. 19:27, “Lord, we have left all to follow you.” Doing so now after two thousand years.
  9. 10.Jesus’ preaching warned of hell and the judgment (Lk. 16:19-31).
  10. 11.Jesus’ preaching was saturated with prayer: “Got up early in the morning to pray” (Mk. 1:35).
  11. 12.Jesus’ preaching reflected His character. His messages were accompanied by tears (Jno. 11:35), kindness, love, and healing. Children were dear to Him (Matt. 18:2).
  12. 13.Jesus’ preaching was courageous: In the Temple, money changers, even confronted Satan in the wilderness (Matthew 4:1-12).
  13. 14.Jesus’ preaching continued to His last breath, “Father forgive them for they know not what they do.” (Lk. 23:34). “It is Finished!”
  14. 15.Jesus commanded His followers to preach (Mk. 16:15, 16; Matthew 28:8-20). We are at a crisis point today relative to needing preachers.

 

JESUS THE PREACHER TRAINED OTHER PREACHERS

  1. A.While fulfilling His preaching mission Jesus selected and trained followers to carry on God’s eternal mission of preaching the Gospel to every person on the earth (Matthew 28:18-20). To do this He didn’t go to a rabbinical or synagogue school of theology or preaching. He didn’t select men who had passed an “ordination quiz” or matched a job description He and the religious leaders of the day had created. These have, sadly, been developed by men.
  2. B.Jesus chose and trained 12 men for three-plus years: Mark 1:16-20; Luke 6:12-16.
    1. 1.All of these men were busy, older, and open to a new adventure (Mk.1:16-20).
    2. 2.They didn’t hesitate or ask about the perks or benefits. “Straightway.”
    3. 3.They had a basic grounding in the Law of Moses.
    4. 4.They were constantly asking questions (Jno. 6:68).
    5. 5.They accompanied Jesus, not sitting in a classroom (Mk. 1:38, “Let us go…).
    6. 6.Jesus continually reminded them of the cost involved (Matt. 16:24).
    7. 7.Jesus had to rebuke them…. (Matt. 18:1-9; 20:21, 22).
    8. 8.Jesus commanded His students to continue the selection and training process (Matt. 28:18-20).
    9. 9.Jesus didn’t “graduate His students” before dying, He and the Holy Spirit continued teaching them after His resurrection and ascension (Lk. 24:44-49; Acts 1:4-11).
    10. 10.The church today, as a whole, has departed from the preaching and training style of Jesus in the 1st-Century.

CONCLUSION:

     Hopefully, these brief points have called our attention to “Knowing Jesus as the Preacher.” The church and world have a desperate need for preachers who will preach and teach like Jesus. The church has an extreme need for training men to preach and teach like Jesus.

 

 

INTRODUCTION:

  1. A.Turn in your Bibles to Matthew 25:14-30:
    1. 1.Jesus’s story of 3 servants.
    2. 2.Story of “Stewardship”
    3. 3.2 of 3 faithful…prospered.
    4. 4.The 3rd was “cast out.” (Afraid).
  2. B.What, biblically, is a “Steward”?
    1. 1.Steward
    2. 2.Numerous application related to managing:
      1. a.A teacher manages students.
      2. b.A boss manages employees.
      3. c.A politician manages our resources.
      4. d.A banker manages our finances, etc.
      5. e.A physician manages our health care.
      6. f.A parent manages children, etc.
      7. g.A judge manages equity of the law.
  3. C.Biblically, every person, especially Christians, is a steward:
    1. 1.Everything belongs to God by right of creation (Gen. 1-3).
      1. a.
      2. b.
      3. c.
      4. d.
      5. e.
      6. f.Job 40:11, “Everything under heaven belongs to God.”
      7. g.1 Tim. 6:7, 8 “We brought nothing and will leave with nothing.”
  4. 2.We are ALL Stewards:
    1. a.1 Cor. 4:1, 2: “Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Moreover it is required in stewards that one be found faithful.”
    2. b.HOW are we managing that which God has given us?
  5. D.The Apostle Paul’s teaching to the Corinthian Christians:
    1. 1.2 Corinthians 8:1-15 (Read):
    2. 2.2 Corinthians 9:1-15 (Read):
  6. E.Some Traits, expediently speaking, of a good servant-steward:
    1. 1.Committed to honest and accountable service—selfless.
    2. 2.Committed to sustainability—not wasteful.
    3. 3.Committed to making wise decisions and choices.
    4. 4.Committed to biblical innovation and change for growth.
    5. 5.Committed to being a “member and team player.”
    6. 6.Committed to being open and above-board.
    7. 7.Committed first and foremost to Christ and Word.

CONCLUSION:

  1. A.We are living in troublesome times:
    1. 1.Pandemic Corona Virus.
    2. 2.Loss of lives, etc.
    3. 3.Financial losses.
  2. B.The church—members—are facing tough times:
    1. 1.Besides the 3 we’ve just mentioned facing everyone.
    2. 2.The church is facing stewardship issues.
    3. 3.The solution is given by God: “God loves a cheerful giver.”
  3. C.Let’s read and study 1 & 2 Corinthian’s stewardship messages this week.

 

  1. D.Remember Malachi’s question: “Will a man ROB God?” (Mal. 3:8).

STEWARDSHIP EVALUATION

The Bible continually encourages us to examine ourselves (Psa. 26:2; 1 Cor. 11:28; 2 Cor. 13:5). Take a moment and examine your present total stewardship practices. Here is a chart covering most of the areas where we fulfill our stewardship responsibilities.

     Using the numerical scale of 1—11, with #1 being the FIRST priority. Use # 2

thru # 11 to identify the following priorities based on your personal numerical ranking. (Review your last 3 months expenditures for proof)

__House mortgage payment

__Giving to the church

__Groceries

__Health care

__Recreation

__Hobbies

__Transportation

__Eating out and entertainment

__Utilities and house upkeep

__Personal grooming

__Savings and investments

 

   How does your evaluation relate to “Seek the Kingdom first” (Matt. 6:33)?

__Matches it

__Close

__Distant

__Not at all

 

 

 

 

 

 

In most congregations, the majority of the members-only see and hear the preacher on Sunday and Wednesday. Two hours a week. How about the other 166 hours during the week? Where is the preacher? What is he doing? Some think he only has to work a couple of hours a week. Others, such as the elders and other leaders, know what he is doing, or should be doing, because of job assignments and accountability procedures.

     The preacher wears many hats during the 166 hours he is not in the pulpit or classroom. He, even though it is not the context, applies Paul’s remarks, “… I have become all things to all men, that I might, by all means, save some” (Cf. 1 Corinthians 9:19-23).

     Humorously, a preacher once wrote on an application in the space asking for his occupation, “Jack of all trades, and master of none.” There may be a speck of truth in his answer. Especially the reference to “Jack of all trades.” And yes, he is master of some.

     During my 55 years of preaching, teaching preachers, and serving as an elder, I have worn and observed other preachers, wearing many hats. Here is a quick list of some of those hats.

  1. Event planner. He is in charge of fellowship meetings. He may have hands-on or be responsible for delegating the responsibility to others.
  2. Office manager. He oversees the day to day events in the church office. The church secretary is his assistant.
  3. Taxi driver. From time to time he is asked to provide transportation for members to go to the doctor or some other appointment.
  4. Funeral director. He is asked to plan, arrange, and carry out the numerous tasks involved in the funeral.
  5. Financial advisor. Members come to him for advice related to financial issues: credit card debt, investments, and budget issues
  6. Community worker. To be a positive influence in the community, the preacher becomes involved; either personally or as a representative of his congregation.
  7. News reporter. In the weekly bulletin, he contributes information about the various activities, needs, and brotherhood events. Thus, he is a Writer.
  8. He is a family man. He has a wife and family that are second place in priority to God and service to Him.
  9. He is a custodian. He empties trash cans, picks up items left on the pews and floor, and checks the restrooms for cleanliness.
  10. He is a coach and trainer. He gives advice, materials, and training classes for those who desire to participate in congregational activities.
  11. He is a referee. He is asked to be an arbitrator in marital conflict, disagreements among brethren, and debates among leaders.
  12. He is a social worker. He helps members apply for unemployment benefits, child care, and other social areas in the lives of members.
  13. He is a CEO. This responsibility is given because of his position and visibility in the affairs of the congregation. He is “the boss”—some prefer the title “lead pastor.”
  14. He is a fundraiser. Drives for budget contributions, mission contributions, and special offerings are promoted by the preacher.
  15. He is a recruiter. He knows the areas of need in the congregation and develops a plan for recruiting and training members to fill those positions.
  16. He is a theologian. He has the “answers’ to every biblical, religious, and opinion issue members, and others, bring to his attention. This is why he is constantly studying.
  17. He is an attendee. He is expected to be present at every congregational meeting, area-wide event, and home gathering he is invited to attend.
  18. He is a fashion guru. He is expected to dress in the current style acceptable to society and the congregation.
  19. He is a wedding consultant. He helps couples prepare for their weddings through counseling, ceremony requirements, protocol and performing the ceremony
  20. He is an entertainer. He is expected to “preach the word” but not be too serious. There is a place for humor, stories, and jokes in sermons and classes.
  21. He is a master of ceremony. Regardless of the event, if it is in the church building, he is expected to preside over the affair.
  22. He is the Master at Arms. He is in charge of the security of the building. The alarms, locking and unlocking, turning lights on and off, etc.
  23. He is an organizer. In addition to his charge to preach the word, evangelize, and appoint elders, he must organize all other activities around his biblical mandates.
  24. He is a chaplain. He is beside those who are bereaved, suffering, and questioning the events in their lives.
  25. He is a memory expert. He is expected to know the names of each member, where they work, attend school, and their birthdays. This allows him to respond appropriately.

These 25 examples are presented, not as criticisms, but as positive observations about the servant heart of preachers. However, on another note it may be observed that these may serve as reminders relative to why some preachers have experienced burnout. How do these observation relate to local preachers and educating the congregation?

                                                                                            ___________________________________

                                                                               J.J. Turner is the author of a book, “505 Observations about Preaching” (amazon. com).

 

INTRODUCTION:

  1. A.Turn in your Bibles to Matthew 25:14-30:
    1. 1.Jesus’s story of 3 servants.
    2. 2.Story of “Stewardship”
    3. 3.2 of 3 faithful…prospered.
    4. 4.The 3rd was “cast out.” (Afraid).
  2. B.What, biblically, is a “Steward”?
    1. 1.Steward
    2. 2.Numerous application related to managing:
      1. a.A teacher manages students.
      2. b.A boss manages employees.
      3. c.A politician manages our resources.
      4. d.A banker manages our finances, etc.
      5. e.A physician manages our health care.
      6. f.A parent manages children, etc.
      7. g.A judge manages equity of the law.
  3. C.Biblically, every person, especially Christians, is a steward:
    1. 1.Everything belongs to God by right of creation (Gen. 1-3).
      1. a.
      2. b.
      3. c.
      4. d.
      5. e.
      6. f.Job 40:11, “Everything under heaven belongs to God.”
      7. g.1 Tim. 6:7, 8 “We brought nothing and will leave with nothing.”
  4. 2.We are ALL Stewards:
    1. a.1 Cor. 4:1, 2: “Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Moreover it is required in stewards that one be found faithful.”
    2. b.HOW are we managing that which God has given us?
  5. D.The Apostle Paul’s teaching to the Corinthian Christians:
    1. 1.2 Corinthians 8:1-15 (Read):
    2. 2.2 Corinthians 9:1-15 (Read):
  6. E.Some Traits, expediently speaking, of a good servant-steward:
    1. 1.Committed to honest and accountable service—selfless.
    2. 2.Committed to sustainability—not wasteful.
    3. 3.Committed to making wise decisions and choices.
    4. 4.Committed to biblical innovation and change for growth.
    5. 5.Committed to being a “member and team player.”
    6. 6.Committed to being open and above-board.
    7. 7.Committed first and foremost to Christ and Word.

CONCLUSION:

  1. A.We are living in troublesome times:
    1. 1.Pandemic Corona Virus.
    2. 2.Loss of lives, etc.
    3. 3.Financial losses.
  2. B.The church—members—are facing tough times:
    1. 1.Besides the 3 we’ve just mentioned facing everyone.
    2. 2.The church is facing stewardship issues.
    3. 3.The solution is given by God: “God loves a cheerful giver.”
  3. C.Let’s read and study 1 & 2 Corinthian’s stewardship messages this week.

 

  1. D.Remember Malachi’s question: “Will a man ROB God?” (Mal. 3:8).

© Dr. JJ Turner and ©Jeremiah Institute - All Rights Reserved (usage)

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